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PostSubject: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:05 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
This list will serve to include just the basic description of building styles. It will also include their country and dates of usage. I will eventually cross reference each listing with a more indepth posting on the individual style.


Tudor Building Style

The main features of Tudor Houses were as follows:
<ul>
<li>Vertical and diagonal blackened timbers (Decorative half-timbering)
<li>Thatched roofs
<li>Overhanging first floors called galleries
<li>Some of the lower stories were built in stone
<li>Arches were smaller and flattened as opposed to the pointed Gothic arches
<li>Pillared porches
<li>Dormer windows and Leaded windows with small window panes
<li>High, spiralled chimneys
<li>Prominent cross gables
<li>Tall, narrow windows
</ul></li>
------------
Egyptian Style


------------
Georgian Style

Identifying Features (1700 – c.1780):
<ul>
<li>A simple 1–2 story box, 2 rooms deep, using strict symmetry arrangements
<li>Panel front door centered, topped with rectangular windows (in door or as a transom) and capped with an elaborate crown/entablature supported by decorative pilasters
<li>Cornice embellished with decorative moldings, usually dentilwork
<li> Multi-pane windows are never paired, and fenestrations are arranged symmetrically (whether vertical or horizontal), usually 5 across</li></ul>

Other features of Georgian style houses can include – roof to ground-level:
<ul>
<li>Roof: 40% are Side-gabled; 25% Gambrel; 25% Hipped
<li>Chimneys on both sides of the home
<li>A portico in the middle of the roof with a window in the middle is more common with post-Georgian styles, e.g. "Adam"
<li>Small 6-paned sash windows and/or dormer windows in the upper floors, primarily used for servant's quarters. This was also a way of reducing window tax.
<li>Larger windows with 9 or 12 panes on the main floors </li></ul>
--------------------
Victorian Style

------------------
1860 - 1890: Stick Style (a form of Victorian)

<ul>
<li>Rectangular shape
<li>Wood siding
<li>Steep, gabled roof
<li>Overhanging eaves
<li>Ornamental trusses (gable braces)
<li>Decorative braces and brackets
<li>Decorative half-timbering
<li>Jerkinhead dormers
</ul></li>

----------------
1855 - 1885: Second Empire (Mansard) Style (a form of Victorian)

<ul>
<li>Mansard roof
<li>Dormer windows project like eyebrows from roof
<li>Rounded cornices at top and base of roof
<li>Brackets beneath the eaves, balconies, and bay windows
<li>Cupola
<li>Patterned slate on roof
<li>Wrought iron cresting above upper cornice
<li>Classical pediments
<li>Paired columns
<li>Tall windows on first story
<li>Small entry porch
</ul></li>
----------------

Prairie Style


----------------
1950s Style


--------------------
1600s - 1950s: Cape Cod House Style

<ul>
<li>Steep roof with side gables
<li>Small roof overhang
<li>1 or 1½ stories
<li>Made of wood and covered in wide clapboard or shingles
<li>Large central chimney linked to fireplace in each room
<li>Symmetrical appearance with door in center
<li>Dormers for space, light, and ventilation
<li>Multi-paned, double-hung windows
<li>Shutters
<li>Formal, center-hall floor plan
<li>Hardwood floors
<li>Little exterior ornamentation
</ul></li>
-----------
1780 - 1840: Federal and Adam House Styles

<ul>
<li>Low-pitched roof, or flat roof with a balustrade
<li>Windows arranged symmetrically around a center doorway
<li>Semicircular fanlight over the front door
<li>Narrow side windows flanking the front door
<li>Decorative crown or roof over front door
<li>Tooth-like dentil moldings in the cornice
<li>Palladian window
<li>Circular or elliptical windows
<li>Shutters
<li>Decorative swags and garlands
<li>Oval rooms and arches
</ul></li>
---------------
1825 - 1860: Greek Revival

<ul>
<li>Pedimented gable
<li>Symmetrical shape
<li>Heavy cornice
<li>Wide, plain frieze
<li>Bold, simple moldings
<li>Entry porch with columns
<li>Decorative pilasters
<li>Narrow windows around front door
</ul></li>
-----------
1840-1880: Gothic Revival (Masonry)

<ul>
<li>Pointed windows with decorative tracery
<li>Grouped chimneys
<li>Pinnacles
<li>Flat roofs with Battlements, or gable roofs with parapets
<li>Leaded glass
<li>Quatrefoil and clover shaped windows
<li>Oriel windows
</ul></li>
-----------
Shotgun House 1861-1930


<ul>
<li>The entire house is no wider than 12 feet (3.5 meters)
<li>Rooms are arranged in a single row, without hallways
<li>The living room is at the front, with bedrooms and kitchen behind
<li>The house has two doors, one at the front and one at the rear
<li>A long pitched roof provides natural ventilation
<li>The house may rest on stilts to prevent flood damage
</ul></li>
------------------------
Modern homes...Ultra Luxury, Luxury and Normal... Excluding Minimalist Modern


--------------

1930 - 1950: Art Moderne


The style we know as Art Moderne may also go by these names:
<ul>
<li>Streamline Moderne
<li>Machine Age
<li>Nautical Moderne
</ul></li>
Art Moderne houses have many of these features:
<ul>
<li>Asymmetrical
<li>Low, horizontal shape
<li>Flat roof
<li>No cornices or eaves
<li>Smooth, white walls
<li>Streamlined appearance
<li>Rounded corners
<li>Glass block windows and wraparound windows
<li>Windows in horizontal rows
<li>Porthole windows and other nautical details
<li>Aluminum and steel window and door trim
<li>Mirrored panels
<li>Steel balustrades
<li>Open floor plans
</ul></li>
-------------
Adobe Style (1900s to Present)



Common Characteristics of Adobe-Style Home Plans:
<ul>
<li>Popular Revival Style, especially in Southwest
<li>Also called Santa Fe Style
<li>Low-pitched or flat roof
<li>Pitched roof often with ceramic tiles (Spanish Colonial & Monterey)
<li>Flat roof usually with surrounding parapet ( Santa Fe, Pueblo)
<li>Thick masonry walls (Revival styles often strawbale or standard construction)
<li>Recessed windows
<li>Simple doors and smaller windows
<li>Roof beams and cross-members often exposed inside
<li>Massive, round-edged walls made with adobe
<li>Stepped levels
<li>Spouts in the parapet to direct rainwater
<li>Latillas (poles) placed above vigas in angled pattern
<li>Beehive corner fireplace
<li>Bancos (benches) that protrude from walls
<li>Nichos (niches) carved out of wall for display of religious icons
<li>Brick, wood, or flagstone floors
</ul></li>

Due to Spanish influence, Pueblo Revival homes may also have these features:
<ul>
<li>Porches held up with zapatas (posts)
<li>Enclosed patios
<li>Heavy wooden doors
<li>Elaborate corbels
</ul></li>
-----------
Saltbox House (1630s - 1800s)



<ul>
<li>An asymmetric roofline, with a long rear slope enclosing an attached addition
<li>Either a uniform slope to the roof or two distinct pitches, with the second, shallower pitch indicating the point of the addition
<li>A central chimney. Colonial remodelers added a new flue to this chimney to create a cooking space for their new kitchens.
</ul></li>

Craftsman/Bungalow (1900-1930) (picture coming soon)

IDENTIFYING FEATURES: Low-pitched, gabled roof, wide overhang of eaves, exposed rafters (rafter tails) under eaves, decorative brackets (knee braces or corbels); incised porch (beneath main roof); tapered or square columns supporting roof or porch; 4-over-1 or 6-over-1 sash windows, often with Frank Lloyd Wright design motifs; hand-crafted stone or woodwork, often mixed materials throughout structure. Bungalows can either be front-gabled, side-gabled, or cross-gabled.


Italian Renaissance (1910-1940) (Picture coming soon)

Usually identified with a low-pitched, hipped roof, often with ceramic tiles and sometimes flat, hinting at its Mediterranean source region; wide, overhanging eaves with large brackets under the roofline; arched doors and windows, primarily on the first floor; Italian-style entryway, often with classical columns; facade usually symmetrical, but occasionally found in asymmetrical or picturesque floor plans. Eave brackets are typically rare on Spanish Revival and Mission-style buildings, thus making them a distinguishing feature of the Italian Renaissance period style.

BEAUX ARTS (1893-1929) (Picture coming soon)

Beaux-Arts style (Les beaux-arts - the fine arts - Ecole des Beaux-Arts in France) was advocated by Americans who studied at the Ecole. The style emphasized classical (Greek) forms and styles, elaborate detailing, massive plans, heavy masonry.


Neoclassical Revival (1893-1940) (Picture coming soon)

Neoclassical (or Neoclassical Revival) became a dominant style for domestic buildings nationwide between 1900-1940s. It was directly inspired by the Beaux-Arts style and the Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair, 1893). The style tends to include the features of: classical symmetry, full-height porch with columns and temple front, and various classical ornament such as dentil cornices. Basically, this is the revival of the Greek Revival style that dominated the first half of the 19th century..














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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:07 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
This section is devoted to beach houses of all kinds! I will add some pictures later when I am on my laptop. Updating while in my IPad lol. The first few links will assist you in finding some good examples of beach house plans and color schemes.

This section will focus on the Caribbean and South Pacific (Tiki) styles to start.


Beach Style Guide
Beach House Pictures & Plans
Beach Color Inspirations

Caribbean Architectural Style

By the time design style completed its journey down the Southeastern seaboard and arrived in Key West, the Southernmost tip of Florida, it had incorporated a little of everything. New England natives, Cubans and fishermen first settled Key West in the 1820s. Its wooden, handcrafted "Conch-style" houses incorporate elements of those cultures and show the influence of Bahamian, African, Creole and Victorian design. Local builders brought the mishmash of architecture to life in the form of hulking frame houses and simple cigar makers' cottages. All the homes were uniquely adapted to life in the tropics, and seafarers often added handy items from ship design, such as crow's nests and the type of "roof hatches" used on board to facilitate ventilation.

Conch-style homes fall into six categories:

Classic Revival: the predominant Conch style, exemplified by wooden gables and posts or columns.

Eyebrow style: a Classic Revival derivative featuring gables and porches and a series of "eyebrow" windows tucked up under the second-floor roof eaves.

Shotgun style: balloon-frame homes for cigar makers. Tracing their origin to West Africa and the French Caribbean, they're small and simple — one story and one room wide — with three rooms end to end, so a shot fired from the front door could exit the back door without resistance.

Queen Anne: characterized by the use of red brick and simple, elegant ornamentation.

Bahama style: homes with wide porches across the length of low facades, spacious verandas and simple balustrades.

Tiki culture

Tiki architecture is fanciful architecture that incorporates Polynesian themes. The word tiki refers to large wood and stone sculptures and carvings found in the Polynesian islands. Tiki buildings are often decorated with imitation tiki and other romanticized details borrowed from the South Seas.

Tiki Architecture Has Many of These Features:

Tikis and carved beams
Lava rock
Imitation bamboo details
Shells and coconuts used as ornaments
Real and imitation palm trees
Imitation thatch roofs
A-frame shapes and extremely steep peaked roofs
Waterfalls

More resources are to come.. Happy building!


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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:07 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
In this topic I want to share unique building designs I have found. This will be great for building inspiration! Please feel free to share your own photos or links Smile


This first one is actually right here in my home town.. The Longaberger Basket Building..


From Poland.. The Crooked House


Also from Poland.. The Upside Down House


Hundertwasser Building(Germany)


Bubble House(France)


Wonderworks
Location: Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.


Cliff side house from Thailand


Tropical rain-forest to the UK


Will be adding more as I find them Smile


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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:08 pm

@Rheassi wrote:


Shotgun Wiki
Description taken from Wiki

The shotgun house is a narrow rectangular domestic residence, usually no more than 12 feet (3.5 m) wide, with doors at each end. It was the most popular style of house in the Southern United States from the end of the American Civil War (1861–65), through to the 1920s.

Shotgun houses consist of three to five rooms in a row with no hallways. The term "shotgun house", which was in use by 1903 but became more common after about 1940, is often said to come from the saying that one could fire a shotgun through the front door and the pellets would fly cleanly through the house and out the back door (since all the doors are on the same side of the house)

<ul>
<li>The entire house is no wider than 12 feet (3.5 meters)
<li>Rooms are arranged in a single row, without hallways
<li>The living room is at the front, with bedrooms and kitchen behind
<li>The house has two doors, one at the front and one at the rear
<li>A long pitched roof provides natural ventilation
<li>The house may rest on stilts to prevent flood damage
</ul></li>

Typical Floorplan:


Variations:

<ul>
<li>Single Shotgun
<li>Double Shotgun
<li>Camelback Single or Double Shotgun
</ul></li>

The double shotgun requires less land per living unit than singles and were used extensively in poor areas. In middle class areas, more single shotgun houses were built. In Bywater, 47% of the shotgun houses are singles.

The rooms of a shotgun house are usually of a good size, approximately 14 feet square and have high ceilings. They usually have some decoration such as moldings, ceiling medallions, and elaborate woodwork.

The street scene provided by a group of shotguns in a row is quite interesting with the projections of overhangs, decorative brackets, and steps.

The shotgun double house has four shuttered openings on the street, two doors and two windows. The shotgun single will have one door and window in the front. Most Bywater shotgun houses are flush with the sidewalk with the steps and overhang projecting out onto the sidewalk. The original steps were of wood box like construction. This provided a bench-like platform on each side facilitating the New Orleans practice of “stoop sitting.”

Early shotgun houses did not contain a bathroom. An outhouse would be constructed in the back yard, and baths would be taken in the bedroom or other room of the house. In later houses, a bathroom with a small hall would be inserted before the last room of the house.

The first two rooms, called double parlors, are usually separated by double pocket doors. The remaining room-to-room doors are single width and may be double leaf “French” doors or single leaf panel doors.

The front roof of the early shotgun ended in a hip. After the 1880’s often a gable was inserted above the overhang. The overhang usually was supported by decorative wooden brackets and contained cast iron ventilators. The front foundation wall included two cast iron ventilators as well.

CONSTRUCTION
The typical Bywater shotgun house is a wooden frame structure, with drop siding on the front and lap siding on the sides and back. Decoration includes fancy brackets supporting the overhang, quoins at each corner and segmented arch shutters covering the door and window openings. It is built on a solid brick foundation wall in the front covered in plaster with two cast iron vents. Brick piers along each side support the rest of the house. These piers are usually not plastered. The fireplaces down the center of a double house provide support as well. The shotgun is typically raised 2 1/2 to 3 feet above ground level in deference to the New Orleans climate. Black slate typically covers the roof of a Bywater shotgun house, but other colors are occasionally found.


Styles that evolved from Shotgun Homes.
<ul>
<li>Railroad Apartment
<li>Terraced House
<li>Mobile Home
</ul></li>

Color palettes for Shotgun homes really depended on the location and time period the home was built. Some suggestions:









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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:12 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Adobe Wiki

Description taken from Wiki

Adobe (play /əˈdoʊbi/, UK /əˈdoʊb/;Arabic: الطوبى) is a natural building material made from sand, clay, water, and some kind of fibrous or organic material (sticks, straw, and/or manure), which the builders shape into bricks using frames and dry in the sun. Adobe buildings are similar to cob and mudbrick buildings. Adobe structures are extremely durable and account for some of the oldest existing buildings in the world. In hot climates, compared with wooden buildings, adobe buildings offer significant advantages due to their greater thermal mass, but they are known to be particularly susceptible to earthquake damage.


Common Characteristics of Adobe-Style Home Plans:
<ul>
<li>Popular Revival Style, especially in Southwest
<li>Also called Santa Fe Style
<li>Low-pitched or flat roof
<li>Pitched roof often with ceramic tiles (Spanish Colonial & Monterey)
<li>Flat roof usually with surrounding parapet ( Santa Fe, Pueblo)
<li>Thick masonry walls (Revival styles often strawbale or standard construction)
<li>Recessed windows
<li>Simple doors and smaller windows
<li>Roof beams and cross-members often exposed inside
<li>Massive, round-edged walls made with adobe
<li>Stepped levels
<li>Spouts in the parapet to direct rainwater
<li>Latillas (poles) placed above vigas in angled pattern
<li>Beehive corner fireplace
<li>Bancos (benches) that protrude from walls
<li>Nichos (niches) carved out of wall for display of religious icons
<li>Brick, wood, or flagstone floors
</ul></li>

Due to Spanish influence, Pueblo Revival homes may also have these features:
<ul>
<li>Porches held up with zapatas (posts)
<li>Enclosed patios
<li>Heavy wooden doors
<li>Elaborate corbels
</ul></li>

Variations of the Pueblo Revival style:
<ul>
<li> Pueblo Deco. Combining Pueblo Revival with Art Deco architecture, these homes are decorated with geometric patterns and Native American designs.
<li> Santa Fe Style. This type of Pueblo became the standard in New Mexico after it was defined by the Santa Fe Historic Zoning Ordinance of 1957.
<li> Contemporary Pueblo. Stripped down, unornamented Pueblos without posts, beams, or vigas.
<li> Territorial Pueblo. Corners are square instead of rounded. Windows are framed with straight wooden moldings.
</ul></li>
These builders are known for their Pueblo Revival buildings:
<ul>
<li> John Gaw Meem
<li> Mary Louise Colter
<li> Glenn Curtiss
</ul></li>

Adobe House Plans

<ul>
<li>Architectural House Plans
<li>E House Plans
</ul></li>

Colors examples:




----------

Largest known Adobe structure still standing


--------------




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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:16 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Some helpful Eqyptian information:
Ancient Egyptian architecture Wiki

Description (taken from above link)
Characteristics of Egyptian Architecture

Due to the scarcity of wood,the two predominant building materials used in ancient Egypt were sun-baked mud brick and stone, mainly limestone, but also sandstone and granite in considerable quantities.From the Old Kingdom onward, stone was generally reserved for tombs and temples, while bricks were used even for royal palaces, fortresses, the walls of temple precincts and towns, and for subsidiary buildings in temple complexes.

Ancient Egyptian houses were made out of mud collected from the Nile river. It was placed in molds and left to dry in the hot sun to harden for use in construction.

Many Egyptian towns have disappeared because they were situated near the cultivated area of the Nile Valley and were flooded as the river bed slowly rose during the millennia, or the mud bricks of which they were built were used by peasants as fertilizer. Others are inaccessible, new buildings having been erected on ancient ones. Fortunately, the dry, hot climate of Egypt preserved some mud brick structures. Examples include the village Deir al-Madinah, the Middle Kingdom town at Kahun, and the fortresses at Buhen and Mirgissa. Also, many temples and tombs have survived because they were built on high ground unaffected by the Nile flood and were constructed of stone.

Thus, our understanding of ancient Egyptian architecture is based mainly on religious monuments, massive structures characterized by thick, sloping walls with few openings, possibly echoing a method of construction used to obtain stability in mud walls. In a similar manner, the incised and flatly modeled surface adornment of the stone buildings may have derived from mud wall ornamentation. Although the use of the arch was developed during the fourth dynasty, all monumental buildings are post and lintel constructions, with flat roofs constructed of huge stone blocks supported by the external walls and the closely spaced columns.

Exterior and interior walls, as well as the columns and piers, were covered with hieroglyphic and pictorial frescoes and carvings painted in brilliant colors. Many motifs of Egyptian ornamentation are symbolic, such as the scarab, or sacred beetle, the solar disk, and the vulture. Other common motifs include palm leaves, the papyrus plant, and the buds and flowers of the lotus. Hieroglyphs were inscribed for decorative purposes as well as to record historic events or spells. In addition, these pictorial frescoes and carvings allow us to understand how the Ancient Egyptians lived, statuses, wars that were fought and their beliefs. This was especially true when exploring the tombs of Ancient Egyptian officials in recent years.

Ancient Egyptian temples were aligned with astronomically significant events, such as solstices and equinoxes, requiring precise measurements at the moment of the particular event. Measurements at the most significant temples may have been ceremonially undertaken by the Pharaoh himself.

Other Wiki links:

<ul>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_for_Documentation_of_Cultural_and_Natural_Heritage>Center for Documentation of Cultural and Natural Heritage</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edfu>Edfu</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_pyramids>Egyptian pyramids</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_Revival_architecture>Egyptian Revival architecture</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_revival_decorative_arts>Egyptian revival decorative arts</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imhotep>Imhotep</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ancient_Egyptian_sites>List of ancient Egyptian sites</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karnak>Karnak</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medinet_Habu_(temple)>Medinet Habu</a>
<li><a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_planning_in_ancient_Egypt>Urban planning in ancient Egypt</a>
</ul></li>

Some other interesting links:

<ul>
<li>ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ARCHITECTURE ONLINE
<li>Modern Egypt Architecture
</ul></li>

Color paletees

The Egyptian palette consisted of 6 colors:

red (desher)
green (wadj)
blue (khesbedj and irtiu)
yellow (kenit and khenet)
black (khem or kem)
white (shesep and hedj)

Some examples from Colourlovers



Other color suggestions:




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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:16 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
The main features of Tudor Houses were as follows:

<ul>
<li>Vertical and diagonal blackened timbers (Decorative half-timbering)
<li>Thatched roofs
<li>Overhanging first floors called galleries
<li>Some of the lower stories were built in stone
<li>Arches were smaller and flattened as opposed to the pointed Gothic arches
<li>Pillared porches
<li>Dormer windows and Leaded windows with small window panes
<li>High, spiralled chimneys
<li>Prominent cross gables
<li>Tall, narrow windows
</ul></li>

An example picture:


Material used for Tudor Houses
Tudor Houses were framed with massive upright, vertical timbers which were usually made of oak and occasionally elm. These vertical timbers were often supported by diagonal timbers. The timbers were blackened and used to create a skeleton which was filled in with brick, plaster or most commonly wattle and daub. Tudor houses of the poor therefore consisted of wattle walls which were daubed with mortar and then whitewash was applied. This building process resulted in the highly distinctive black and white half-timbered Tudor Houses.

Tudor Wiki

(Description taken from Wiki link above)
The Tudor architectural style is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. It followed the Perpendicular style and, although superseded by Elizabethan architecture in domestic building of any pretensions to fashion, the Tudor style still retained its hold on English taste, portions of the additions to the various colleges of Oxford and Cambridge being still carried out in the Tudor style which overlaps with the first stirrings of the Gothic Revival.

Home plan suggestions:

<ul>
<li>The House Designers
<li>Amazing Plans.com
</ul></li>

Color suggestions:





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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:17 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Descriptive info taken from Wikipedia

Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1720 and 1840.


Identifying Features (1700 – c.1780):
<ul>
<li>* A simple 1–2 story box, 2 rooms deep, using strict symmetry arrangements
<li>* Panel front door centered, topped with rectangular windows (in door or as a transom) and capped with an elaborate crown/entablature supported by decorative pilasters
<li>* Cornice embellished with decorative moldings, usually dentilwork
<li> * Multi-pane windows are never paired, and fenestrations are arranged symmetrically (whether vertical or horizontal), usually 5 across</li></ul>

Other features of Georgian style houses can include – roof to ground-level:
<ul>
<li>* Roof: 40% are Side-gabled; 25% Gambrel; 25% Hipped
<li>* Chimneys on both sides of the home
<li>* A portico in the middle of the roof with a window in the middle is more common with post-Georgian styles, e.g. "Adam"
<li>* Small 6-paned sash windows and/or dormer windows in the upper floors, primarily used for servant's quarters. This was also a way of reducing window tax.
<li>* Larger windows with 9 or 12 panes on the main floors </li></ul>

The revived Georgian style that emerged in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century is usually referred to as Neo-Georgian; the work of Edwin Lutyens includes many examples. Versions of the Neo-Georgian style were commonly used in Britain for certain types of urban architecture until the late 1950s, Bradshaw Gass & Hope's Police Headquarters in Salford of 1958 being a good example. In both the United States and Britain, the Georgian style is still employed by architects like Quinlan Terry Julian Bicknell and Fairfax and Sammons for private residences.

Architects of Note:
<ul>
<li>Quinlan Terry
<li>Edwin Lutyens
<li>James Paine
<li>Robert Taylor
<li>John Wood, the Elder
<li>Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington
<li>William Kent
<li>Isaac Ware
<li>Henry Flitcroft
<li>Giacomo Leoni
</li></ul>

House plans:
<ul>
<li>Eplans.com
<li>Authentic Historical Design
<li>House Plans and more.com
<li>Houseplans.net
</ul></li>

Suggested colors:

Georgian palette (Heritage Georgian color examples)
1714 - 1837



The Georgian palette contained both subtle and stronger shades but overall looked understated and elegant. Palladian style tended to concentrate on colours that were classical looking and replicated stone, marble and alabaster. The Adam style tended to favour softer pastel shades and used to delicate and complex combinations, or single shades with details highlighted in off-whites or neutral tones. Blues were used in combination with off-white for a restrained classical look.

The aspect of a room was a very important factior when choosing colours, with shades such as Pea Colour, green Oxide and Lavender Grey being though most suitable for warm south facing rooms whilst DH Blossom, Pale Sienna or Warm Stone would have been selected for cooler, north facing ones.

In exterior settings DH Gold Colours, greens and greys tended to be favoured - doors were painted in a dark shade, with the door surround painted in off-white or 'stone' colour. Invisible Green was traditionally used of railings, both public and private, to render them 'invisible' and cause them to blend in with the surrounding vegetation and foliage.




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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:19 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Descriptive Info taken from Wikipedia

The term Victorian architecture refers collectively to several architectural styles employed predominantly during the middle and late 19th century. The period that it indicates may slightly overlap the actual reign, 20 June 1837 – 22 January 1901, of Queen Victoria. This represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch.

Styles conceived in the Victorian era
<ul>
<li>Jacobethan(1830–70)
<li>Renaissance Revival(1840–90)
<li>Neo-Grec (1845–65)
<li>Romanesque Revival
<li>Second Empire(1855–80; originated in France)
<li>Queen Anne(1870–1910)
<li>Scots Baronial (predominantly Scotland)
<li>British Arts and Crafts movement (1880–1910)
</ul></li>

Noted Architects
<ul>
<li>Joseph Paxton
<li>Augustus Pugin
<li>Alexander Thomson
<li>Archibald Simpson
<li>Alexander Marshall Mackenzie
</ul></li>

Victorian House plans:
<ul>
<li>The House Designers.com
<li>Architectural Designs.com
<li>The Plan Collection.com
</ul></li>

Victorian Color Schemes







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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:21 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prairie_School

Prairie School was a late 19th and early 20th century architectural style, most common to the Midwestern United States.

The works of the Prairie School architects are usually marked by horizontal lines, flat or hipped roofs with broad overhanging eaves, windows grouped in horizontal bands, integration with the landscape, solid construction, craftsmanship, and discipline in the use of ornament. Horizontal lines were thought to evoke and relate to the native prairie landscape.

The term "Prairie School" was not actually used by these architects to describe themselves (for instance, Marion Mahony used the phrase The Chicago Group); the term was coined by H. Allen Brooks, one of the first architectural historians to write extensively about these architects and their work[citation needed].

The Prairie School developed in sympathy with the ideals and design aesthetics of the Arts and Crafts Movement begun in the late 19th century in England by John Ruskin, William Morris, and others. The Prairie school shared an embrace of handcrafting and craftsman guilds as a reaction against the new assembly line, mass production manufacturing techniques, which they felt created inferior products and dehumanized workers.

The Prairie School was also an attempt at developing an indigenous North American style of architecture that did not share design elements and aesthetic vocabulary with earlier styles of European classical architecture. Many talented and ambitious young architects had been attracted by building opportunities stemming from the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago World's Fair) of 1893 was supposed to be a heralding of the city of Chicago's rebirth. But many of the young Mid-western architects of what would become the Prairie School were offended by the Greek and Roman classicism of nearly every building erected for the fair. In reaction, they sought to create new work in and around Chicago that would display a uniquely modern and authentically American style, which came to be called Prairie.

The designation Prairie is due to the dominant horizontality of the majority of Prairie style buildings which echos the wide, flat, tree-less expanses of the mid-Western United States. The most famous proponent of the style, Frank Lloyd Wright, promoted an idea of "organic architecture", the primary tenet of which was that a structure should look as if it naturally grew from the site. Wright also felt that a horizontal orientation was a distinctly American design motif, in that the younger country had much more open, undeveloped land than found in most older, urbanized European nations.

----------------------------------------
Architects to read about for more inspiration

<ul>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright">Frank Lloyd Wright</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Percy_Dwight_Bentley&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="Percy Dwight Bentley (page does not exist)">Percy Dwight Bentley</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_S._Van_Bergen">John S. Van Bergen</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Buck">Lawrence Buck</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Byrne">Barry Byrne</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Caldwell">Alfred Caldwell</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Eugene_Drummond" title="William Eugene Drummond">William Drummond</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Grant_Elmslie">George Grant Elmslie</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Mahony_Griffin">Marion Mahony Griffin</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Burley_Griffin">Walter Burley Griffin</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_John_Klutho">Henry John Klutho</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington_Maher" class="mw-redirect" title="George Washington Maher">George Washington Maher</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwight_Heald_Perkins" class="mw-redirect" title="Dwight Heald Perkins">Dwight Heald Perkins</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gray_Purcell">William Gray Purcell</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabel_Roberts">Isabel Roberts</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Robert_C._Spencer&amp;action=edit&amp;redlink=1" class="new" title="Robert C. Spencer (page does not exist)">Robert C. Spencer</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Conroy_Sullivan">Francis Conroy Sullivan</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_and_Starck">Claude and Starck</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_LaBarthe_Steele" class="mw-redirect" title="William LaBarthe Steele">William LaBarthe Steele</a></li>
<li><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Willatzen" class="mw-redirect" title="Andrew Willatzen">Andrew Willatzen</a></li>
</ul>

-------------------------------------

House Plans:

<ul>
<li>Architectural Designs
<li>House Plans.com
<li>The Plan Collection.com</li></ul>

----------------
Colors Ideas:





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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:21 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Noteable Home Designers of the 1950s

Frank Lloyd Wright

Experts believe the greatest lasting influence on architecture in the 1950s and 1960s was that of Wright and Mies van der Rohe. Already an old man in 1950 (he died at age eighty-nine in 1959), Wright continued to design astonishing buildings throughout the decade. His Price Tower (1953-1956) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, was an imaginative variation on the high-rise housing structure. His Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1956-1959) in New York was a free-form structure in an urban context, and it was extremely controversial. Wright also designed several fascinating religious buildings near the end of his life, including the Unitarian Church (completed after his death in 1965) in Madison, Wisconsin, and the Orthodox Church (1961) near Milwaukee. Wright's stunning originality made him suspect to modern purists, who wanted everything simple, stark, and similar. But Wright's legacy endures. The fact that American architecture was so influential in the 1950s— and throughout the twentieth century—is due in large measure to the contributions of Wright.

Mies van der Rohe

Mies van der Rohe's influence came through his architectural designs and also through his teaching position at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where he influenced countless aspiring architects. Among his buildings is the entire campus complex of the Illinois Institute of Technology, done between 1938 and 1955. Disciples of Mies van der Rohe were everywhere in 1950s America. They designed unadorned glass-and-steel buildings (with concrete slabs creating the ceilings and floors) for large corporations across the country—though not usually with the flair of their master. The architects of the firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill were some of the better-known disciples of Mies van der Rohe. In designing buildings that were impersonal in appearance, they worked in anti-individualistic committees—or "teams"—that had little to no direct contact with a client. The company's 1952 Lever House in New York was a good example of this impersonal, anonymous architecture.





1950s architecture and Interior designs:
A collection of pictures showing 1950's Interior Design and Residential architecture
Retro House Plans
Antique Homes
Houseplans.com
Googie Architecture


Some ideas for colors palettes from the 1950s






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PostSubject: Re: Build Styles   Tue Feb 21, 2012 1:08 pm

@Rheassi wrote:
Modern Architects: (work in progress.. Will add links soon)

Alvar Aalto
Gunnar Asplund
Luis Barragan
Marcel Breuer
Pierre Chareau
Wells Coates
Joseph Emberton
Max Fry
Ernö Goldfinger
Walter Gropius
Hugo Häring
Herman Hertzberger
Howard, Killick, Partridge & Amis
Arne Jacobsen
Philip Johnson
Louis Kahn
Denys Lasdun
John Lautner
Sigurd Lewerentz
Adolf Loos
Berthold Lubetkin
Robert Mallet-Stevens
Robert Matthew
Pier Luigi Nervi
Richard Neutra
Eero Saarinen
Hans Scharoun
Rudolf Schindler
James Stirling
Jorn Utzon
Mies Van der Rohe
Aldo van Eyck
Frank Lloyd Wright


Modern Color Suggestions:





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